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Theme of 36th Annual
KALAMAZOO
Living History
SHOW

Sponsored By

YANKEE DOODLE MUZZLE LOADERS, INC.

War Drums, Intrigue, Prophecy, and Trembling Earth
Enemies Born Again for the War of 1812

The treaty that ended the American Revolution established the independence of the United States and gave it control over the vast territory between the Ohio River and the Great Lakes. The Treaty of Greenville in 1795 brought about an uneasy peace with the Native tribes of the Western frontier. However, as the second decade of the 19th century dawned, the British had not relinquished many of their former holdings and a new Native confederacy had arisen with a capital city- Prophet’s Town- deep in the Western wilderness.

In 2011, the Kalamazoo Living history Show™ welcomes presenters from the Tippecanoe Battlefield, George Rogers Clark National Historic Park, Fort Recovery, and Historic Fort Wayne to tell the story of how an infant republic must once again confront old enemies to keep its hard-won independence.


“We Bring History Alive!”

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS


Saturday, March 19th Room “B” Sunday, March 20th Room “B”
10:00
The Northwest Territory- A Commitment to Democracy
Presenter: Frank Doughman, George Rogers Clark National Historical Park, Chief of Interpretation
10:00
Collision Course- The Native Resistance and the Battle of Tippecanoe
Presenter: Rick Conwell, Tippecanoe Battlefield Site Manager
11:15
Overview of the History of Fort Recovery
Co-presenters: Nancy Knapke, Fort Recovery Museum Director, Chris Keller, Ball State Archaeologist/Fort Recovery Museum Trustee President
11:15
The Siege of Fort Wayne in 1812

Co-presenters: Sean O’Brien, Past President, Historic Fort Wayne, and Norm Gable, President, Historic Fort Wayne

12:30
The Siege of Fort Wayne in 1812

Co-presenters: Sean O’Brien, Past President, Historic Fort Wayne, and Norm Gable, President, Historic Fort Wayne

12:30
Overview of the History of Fort Recovery

Co-presenters: Nancy Knapke, Fort Recovery Museum Director, Chris Keller, Ball State Archaeologist/Fort Recovery Museum Trustee President
1:45
Collision Course- The Native Resistance and the Battle of Tippecanoe

Presenter: Rick Conwell, Tippecanoe Battlefield Site Manager
1:45
The Northwest Territory- A Commitment to Democracy

Presenter: Frank Doughman, George Rogers Clark National Historical Park, Chief of Interpretation
3:00
Reenactor Jeopardy!

Test your history knowledge! All welcome!
 

Collision Course- The Native Resistance and the Battle of Tippecanoe
Presenter: Rick Conwell, Tippecanoe Battlefield Site manager

“Collision Course” will focus on the Battle of Tippecanoe, which is considered by many scholars to be the opening volley of the War of 1812. The dislocation and upheaval that American settlement brought to the Northwest Territory frontier instigated great conflict with the Native peoples, which culminated at the Battle of Tippecanoe. Government policies of the Jefferson and Madison administrations will be outlined, as well as the development of the Native confederacy that led to the building of “Prophet’s Town.” Topics scheduled include the American campaign preparation, the sequence of the battle, the aftermath, and the consequences, which resulted in the ending of Native hostilities in the area and a burgeoning political career for William Henry Harrison almost thirty years after the battle.

Presenter Rick Conwell is the Site Manager of the Tippecanoe Battlefield and the Museum Store Manager of the Tippecanoe County Historical Association. He is also the Vice President of the Kalamazoo Living History Show™, and has reproduced 18th century silverwork for many years through his business, Historical Silverwork. Mr. Conwell catalogued the extensive collection of artifacts from Fort Ouiatenon, the first European settlement in the state of Indiana. He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Ball State University, and has been involved in living history for over 40 years.

The Northwest Territory- A Commitment to Democracy
Presenter: Frank Doughman, George Rogers Clark National Historical Park, Chief of Interpretation

In his presentation, Mr. Doughman will address the development of the Northwest Territory. Drawing on his extensive historical knowledge from his many years of professional study on the subject, Mr. Doughman will discuss how the development of the Northwest Territory affected the growing United Sates, and how happenings and political intrigue in the area led towards the Battle of Tippecanoe and the War of 1812. He will also examine how these historical events inspired and contributed to the sense of purpose and commitment to democracy in the New Republic.

Frank Doughman has served as the Chief of Interpretation at George Rogers National Historical Park since 1995, where he oversees the planning and designing of all interpretive media and exhibits. He served as a National Park Service Interpretive Development Program Curriculum Coordinator for nine years. He is currently an instructor for the NPS Interpretive Development program and serves as a Lead Interpretive Coach for the Midwest Region. Mr. Doughman holds a Bachelors degree in Parks and Recreation Management from the University of Maine. He is chairing the Vincennes War of 1812 Bicentennial Committee, as well as the Indiana Territory War of 1812 Bicentennial group. Mr. Doughman recently served as the Interim Superintendent of America’s newest National Park- the River Raisin National Battlefield Park in Monroe, Michigan.

Overview of the History of Fort Recovery
Co-presenters: Nancy Knapke, Fort Recovery Museum Director, and Chris Keller, Ball State Archaeologist/Fort Recovery Museum Trustee President

The two largest Indian battles in the history of the United States occurred at Fort Recovery- St. Clair’s Defeat in 1791 and the Battle of Fort Recovery in 1794. St. Clair’s Defeat was the worst defeat of the U.S. Army in America’s history. The defeat of St. Clair’s army is the greatest victory of a Native force over a white invading force in the history of the world. St. Clair’s Defeat led to the first ever U.S. Congressional investigation, although St. Clair was eventually acquitted of all charges. At the Battle of Fort Recovery, the largest confederation of Natives ever organized (over 2,000) battled against their American foes. With the defeat of the Natives at the Battle of Fort Recovery, this served to severely weaken the Native confederation. General Anthony Way’s victory in 1794 opened the way for U.S. expansion and insured the future development of the United States of America. The Fort Recovery State Museum has the largest and most complete pre-historic artifact collection on display in the state of Ohio.

Co-presenters Nancy Knapke and Chris Keller will give an overview of the significance of Fort Recovery’s history, and discuss what work needs to be done as part of the National Battlefield Grant Ball State University and Fort Recovery recently received. They will bring significant and interesting artifacts to be displayed at the show.

Nancy Knapke serves as the Director of the Fort Recovery State Museum. The museum is a member site of the Ohio Historical Society and is operated jointly by the Ohio Historical Society and the Fort Recovery Historical Society. Points of interest include a reconstructed fort, a log cabin, a blacksmith shop, and Monument Park.

Christine Keller is currently an archaeologist at Ball State university’s Applied Archaeology Laboratories and is responsible for CRM work, grant projects, public archaeology, and incorporating undergraduate and graduate students into all aspects of archaeology. She also volunteers at the Fort Recovery State Museum and serves as the president of the trustees. In a former life, Ms. Keller spent 25 years in software development and technology project management in both business and K-12 education.

The Siege of Fort Wayne in 1812
Co-presenters: Sean O’Brien and Norm Gable

Fort Wayne, Indiana has had a number of European and American fortifications built in the area, spanning over 100 years of history. These forts went by the various names of Fort Miamis, Fort Miami, and Fort Wayne. The first fort (which may have been constructed as early as the 1680’s) was initially built for trade with the Indians, but increasing tension between France and England developed over the territory. After the French and Indian War, the fort was ceded to England. In 1763, it fell to Native control, which lasted for more than thirty years. In 1790, the United States Army utilized the fort in an attempt to subdue the Native peoples through a series of battles, and appointed “Mad” Anthony Wayne to lead the troops. The American fort, now renamed Fort Wayne, was dedicated in 1794. Sean O’Brien and Norm Gable will discuss the Siege of Fort Wayne in September 1812- how it started, how it ended, and how the events going on in the Old Northwest Territory played into it. They will discuss current successes and challenges with Historic Fort Wayne, as well as talk about current events sponsored by the site.

Sean O’Brien enjoyed spending time at Historic Fort Wayne during its earlier “hey day,” and began a lifelong devotion to the welfare of the historic site. He has been involved with portraying military and civilian characters from the French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, and 1812 periods since 1997. He has been a cast member in two History Channel shows, a PBS history special, and the movie “The Patriot.” In 2004, a group of citizens took on the task of revitalizing the reconstructed fort, and formed the not-for-profit entity Historic Fort Wayne, Inc. Mr. O’Brien helped lead these energized and enthusiastic volunteers. A lively, entertaining, and educational series of programs and special events are held at the fort year round to enlighten visitors of all ages as to Historic Fort Wayne’s vivid past. Mr. O’Brien is a current board member and past president of Historic Fort Wayne, Inc.

Norm Gable’s first exposure to “living history” came during his college years at Purdue University, where he discovered the Feast of the Hunters’ Moon historical event. After he married, Mr. Gable enjoyed taking his children to living history events. He took an avid interest in blacksmithing, and for ten years has been active in the Indiana Blacksmithing Association. This interest in blacksmithing opened doors for Mr. Gable into the historical reenacting community, and he now demonstrates at many reenactments and has constructed some of the period ironware for the Historic Fort Wayne revitalization. He currently serves as the President of Historic Fort Wayne, Inc.

Show Rooms


FUTURE SHOW DATES

March 17-18, 2012

March 16-17, 2013


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